LAK11 – Tuesday afternoon

Liveblog notes from the afternoon session on Tuesday 1 March, the second full day of the Learning Analytics and Knowledge ’11 (LAK11) conference in Banff, Canada.

[Edit 3 Feb 2014: Comments disabled because of spam – do comment on others if you want to say something.]

(Previously: The Learning Analytics Cycle, liveblog notes from Pre-Conference Workshop morning and afternoon, from Monday morning and afternoon, and from Tuesday morning.)

It’s still bitterly cold, but it’s bright, sunny and clear, and the views are even more stunning than this morning. With this scenery and situation, I can understand why Banff Centre is a hub for creativity and inspiration – it is remarkable here.

(Note nearly frostbitten thumb in top left hand corner.)

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LAK11 – Tuesday morning

Liveblog notes from the morning session on Tuesday 1 March, the second full day of the Learning Analytics and Knowledge ’11 (LAK11) conference in Banff, Canada.

(Previously: The Learning Analytics Cycle, liveblog notes from Pre-Conference Workshop morning and afternoon, and from Monday morning and afternoon.)

view out of the window of the restaurant at the Banff CentreIt’s fearsomely cold here – about -30C this morning – but stunningly beautiful. This is a quick snap out of the window of the restaurant where we had breakfast. There are views of the Rockies all around. If I’d brought a better camera – and was a better photographer – you’d get some staggering pictures.

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LAK11 – Monday afternoon

Liveblog notes from the afternoon session on Monday 28 February, the first full day of the Learning Analytics and Knowledge ’11 (LAK11) conference in Banff, Canada.

(Previously: The Learning Analytics Cycle, liveblog notes from Pre-Conference Workshop morning and afternoon, and from Monday morning.)

Introduction to Xavier Ochoa. Principal Professor at ESPOL, Ecuador. Work on learning objects, inventor of ‘learnometrics’

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LAK11: Monday morning

Liveblog notes from the morning of Monday 28 February, the first full day of the Learning Analytics and Knowledge ’11 (LAK11) conference in Banff, Canada.

(Previously: The Learning Analytics Cycle, liveblog notes from Pre-Conference Workshop morning and afternoon.)

George Siemens – Welcome

Thanks to TEKRI at Athabasca; Centre of Educational Innovation and Technology, U Queensland; EDUCAUSE. Thanks to four platinum sponsors – Kaplan Venture, Alberta Innovates, Desire2Learn, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Thanks to steering committee. Thanks to program chairs and program committee. Gill who helps organise and support administratively. Chris too. And Blaze who’s working the video on ustream – will be recorded and made available later. Backchat on #LAK11.

Why learning analytics? We’re in a knowledge economy, and the foundation is data. We need to better understand the data exhaust being produced by students, and the teachers, as they interact and work online. Various initiatives in Canada to make it a leader in the knowledge economy. Shift from physical- to knowledge-based economies. We haven’t had as much time in understanding how to create value in the knowledge economy. That’s where learning analytics becomes important.

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LAK11 – Sunday afternoon

Liveblog notes from the afternoon of the pre-conference workshop (Sunday 27 Feb 2011) of the Learning Analytics and Knowledge (LAK11) conference.

There was an excellent discussion over lunch about the power of simple measures to infer great – and privacy-threatening – amounts of information. So, for instance, you can guess well at what appliances someone has in their house simply by looking at the usage of electricity over a 24-hour period, using a smart meter. And then that raised the possibility of identifying an appliance that was about to break down simply from a change in its use in electricity over time. Which would be gold dust for advertisers, since they could potentially target you with an advert for a new washing machine before you even know that you’re going to need to buy one in the next few weeks, because they know yours is about to break down.

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LAK11: Learning Analytics And Knowledge, Banff

I’m at the 1st Learning Analytics and Knowledge conference, at the Banff Centre in Banff, Canada.

Today – Sunday 27th February 2011 – is the Pre-Conference Workshops . It’s being streamed live. The hashtag is #LAK11, which is also the tag for the pre-conference open course on learning analytics.

We are right in the middle of the Rocky Mountains, and the views all around are stunning.

This is the first of (probably) six or more liveblog notes – my plan is one per half day.

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Seeing how people really use online technology with the Tobii eye-tracker

Liveblog notes from an IET Technology Coffee Morning, 16 December 2009.

Presenters: Patrick McAndrew, Graham Healing, with input from Elpida Makriyannis and Anne Adams

We have a Tobii eye-tracker in the labs, which isn’t used as heavily as it could be. Aim for today is to show how easy it is to use, and explore some of the ways it could be developed.

History – a few years ago, Graham and Patrick were trying to improve the OpenLearn website. It was hard to know whether their worries about its effectiveness were real. Used an eye tracker to do a brief study of what actually happens. It was amazingly revealing, and very efficient – just a few minutes of recording and playback showed them the interactions on the site. That then grew in to quite a study, with analysis. At that point, the technology was hard work – took many extra hours. But now have bought more recent kit, with software upgrades, which make it very easy to use.

Some classic research in to how people read pages – like Jakob Nielsen’s classic (2001) work showing an F-shaped reading pattern for web pages. But is it still true?

Has been around since the 1950s! Now more up to date – see e.g. this presentation, which is about the machine we have:

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